SCANOGEN NEWS

NEWS

September 29, 2020
New Scanogen Study in Nature Communications Outlines Breakthrough Molecular Detection Technology. The novel amplification-free and purification-free approach is being used by the Company to develop a novel diagnostic platform.

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September 9, 2020
Scanogen is granted US patent 10,768,406 which cover the optical system used in SMOLT. The patent claims include an imaging system to determine the position or movement of particles over a large field of view.
July 1, 2020
A team at Scanogen has adapted SMOLT technology for detecting the novel coronavirus genome directly in saliva samples. The study showed a limit of detection of 150 copies per 30 microliters of saliva.
February 7, 2020
Scanogen receives a new grant for $3 million from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to develop a platform for rapid detection of bloodstream infections without the need of blood culture.
September 20, 2019
Gregory Meehan, former General Manager of the Diagnostics Division at Becton Dickinson joins Scanogen as CCO. Greg joins the company to lead the commercialization strategy of our first product.
March 29, 2019
Scanogen expands laboratories by adding adjacent 1,200 sqft. The additional laboratory space will accelerate the development and testing of SMOLT -based assays.
January 15, 2019
Scanogen is granted US patent 10,179,930 which covers Single Molecule Tethering (SMOLT) technology. The patent claims include detection of molecules, such as nucleic acids, proteins and metabolites, using long probes where the long probes can be a variety of polymers, including double-stranded DNA.
August 31, 2018
New studies show that Single Molecule Scanning can detect microorganisms in blood and sputum at concentrations as low as one organism per milliliter of sample.
April 15, 2017
Scanogen receives $600,000 in an SBIR grant Phase I from National Institute of Aging.
February 10, 2017
Scanogen receives a new grant for $3 million from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to develop a rapid point-of-care assay for Tuberculosis detection.
July 5, 2016
Scanogen is granted two U.S. patents for inventions that use DNA supercoiling to detect biomolecules. US 9,382,578 describes circular biosensors that compact when target molecules are present in the sample. US 9,382,580 describes Twist-Biosensor, a single molecule approach in which DNA tethered beads are displaced when target molecules are present in the sample.
May 15, 2016
Scanogen receives two SBIR grants, $225,000 from the National Human Genome Research Institute, and $225,000 from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.
February 1, 2016
Scanogen moves to new facilities. The new space has newly renovated laboratories and offices, with a total area of 4,000 sq ft.
October 1, 2015
Scanogen TB assay is described in the TB Diagnostics Technology and Market Landscape report. “In the context of limited-resource setting TB diagnosis, Single Molecule Scanning may offer important advantages over the available amplification-based molecular platforms.”
July 1, 2015
Scanogen receives $289,322 in phase I SBIR from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.
May 15, 2014
Scanogen receives two new SBIR grants, $700,000 from the National Human Genome Research Institute, and $599,760 from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.